South Carolina Coastal Conservation League, Inc.
P.O. Box 1765
Charleston SC 29402
Contact Information
Organization DBA (Doing Business As)
Organization DBA
Address P.O. Box 1765
Charleston, SC 29402
Telephone (843) 7238035
Fax (843) 7238308
E-mail action@scccl.org
Projected Annual Revenue $2,810,200.00 (2015)
Mission Statement South Carolina Coastal Conservation League was founded in 1989 by Dana Beach to protect and preserve the natural and human environment of the South Carolina coast and its traditional landscape.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Edward Dana Beach
Board Chair Mrs. Andrea Cooper
Board Chair Company Affiliation Ziff Properties, Inc.
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1989
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
Revenue vs Expenses Area Graph - All Years

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Statements
Mission South Carolina Coastal Conservation League was founded in 1989 by Dana Beach to protect and preserve the natural and human environment of the South Carolina coast and its traditional landscape.
Background

With a mission of protecting the natural environment of the South Carolina coastal plain and enhancing the quality of life in our communities, the Coastal Conservation League was founded primarily to address land use issues in the face of widespread development. Our vision is one of highly functional urban areas along with thriving small towns and rural communities embedded in a continuous "green belt" of protected land supported by a vibrant local farming economy driving rural prosperity and serving South Carolina consumers; a transportation system that includes public transit, bicycles, pedestrians, and automobiles; clean air and water; and high levels of clean, efficient energy.

Recognizing the connection between land conservation, natural resource and environmental protection, and the vitality of rural communities and a traditional industry like agriculture, the Conservation League launched a Food and Agriculture program which led to the state's first local food hub. Founded by the Conservation League in late September 2011, GrowFood Carolina strives to help the local food market reach its full potential by providing meaningful opportunities to rural farmers that will strengthen and secure the future of a regional food supply and ensure that rural lands remain in agricultural use.

The hallmark of our success has been defined by our approach of building community relationships, collaborating with other organizations, forging coalitions, and reaching compromises to ultimately effect change in our program areas of Land Use, Water and Air Quality, Food and Agriculture, and Climate and Energy. 

Impact
Top 4 accomplishments for 2015 include the following:
Solar Energy Settlement – After two years of negotiation, utilities and conservationists unveiled and successfully passed a legislative proposal that expands the contribution of solar power to the state's energy inventory by as much as forty-fold by 2020. The Conservation League’s efforts were integral to this success. In late 2014, the Conservation League also signed a groundbreaking agreement with the state’s investor-owned utilities, electric cooperatives, and energy regulators that defines the price investors can expect from solar energy production. Combined, these accomplishments will dramatically accelerate the construction of new solar facilities and renewable energy generation in South Carolina.
 
The Case for Compromise: Deepening the Charleston Harbor – The Coastal Conservation League, Lowcountry Open Land Trust, and the Southern Environmental Law Center announced an historic compromise with the South Carolina Ports Authority (SCSPA) regarding the deepening of the Charleston Harbor. The agreement includes a $5.1 million investment in the conservation of the Cooper River Corridor by the SCSPA and ensures the timely progress forward of harbor deepening. The compromise was approved by the Joint Bond Review Committee in February 2015.
 
GrowFood Carolina Milestone – After three years of operation, with better than projected increases in volume, farmers, and customers year after year, GrowFood Carolina has now exceeded the $1 million mark in payments to farmers for local produce.
 
We must ensure that the scope and scale of our work allows us to meet the most pressing conservation threats facing the South Carolina coast that, left unmet, will severely compromise our environment – eliminating the farms and forests that define our region, degrading our rivers, creeks and wetlands, polluting the air in our cities, and jeopardizing the health of our citizens. In 2015 and beyond, several of our initiatives include:
Extending the greenbelt around the Lowcountry – from the Savannah River to the North Carolina border by protecting 55,000 acres of the East Edisto/MeadWestvaco property between the Ashley and the Edisto rivers, protecting the upper half of Cainhoy Plantation adjoining the Francis Marion National Forest, and protecting strategic parcels on undeveloped sea islands, including Johns, Wadmalaw, Edisto and St. Helena.
Advocating for transportation reforms at the state level, and local and state-level policies and decisions that invest transportation dollars for priority uses
 
Reducing air pollution from major sources including power plants, factories, ships, and trucks by promoting the installation of shore power at the cruise ship terminal in downtown Charleston, and working with the State Port Authority to implement clean truck program and to make monitoring program public and understandable for all terminals
 
Developing statewide water withdrawal standards that protect water quality and quantity, aquatic life, and recreational uses in South Carolina’s rivers by amending and implementing water withdrawal legislation
 
Protecting natural beach environments; healthy populations of dolphin, sea turtles, and other keystone species; breeding and migratory bird habitat; and priority ecological resources
 
Supporting vibrant agricultural economies by increasing the percentage of South Carolina food provided by in-state farmers from 10% to 20%, developing a statewide network of local food hubs, and advocating for regulatory changes influencing local farming and food processing
 
Increasing renewable energy and energy efficiency in South Carolina by promoting maximum deployment of energy efficiency measures in households, businesses, and government buildings and enabling increased energy production from in-state, clean, renewable sources
Needs
Over the next year the Coastal Conservation League will work more boldly than ever. Our top immediate needs for 2015 and the next 5 years include:
 
Protect the quality of life on the South Carolina coast
  • Protect tens of thousands more acres of precious land between the Savannah River and the North Carolina border by 2020
  • Implement comprehensive plans and zoning codes to promote inspiring and livable communities, not sprawl
  • Partner with citizens and local and state governments to pass legislation the protects our clean air and water
  Enhance staff resources and development
  • Hire a senior staff member with expertise in community planning
  • Hire an outreach director to design new participatory opportunities
Expand GrowFood Carolina
  • Add new infrastructure, equipment, and expertise to increase market share and diversify farmer participation 
  • Increase direct assistance to farmers to help them incorporate stricter food safety protocols by best practices and certifications, thereby increasing their market opportunities
  • Support new regional food hubs to create a robust regional food system
Expand our message and engage new audiences
  • Hire a marketing and communications firm to maximize our message to specific audiences and to create and maintain constituent data for relationship building
  • Design strategies to capture new constituent information while increasing engagement
  • Increase supporters and advocates
  • Expand the conservation ethic in the Lowcountry among new and long-time residents
  • Diversify our membership so many more South Carolina residents become part of the conservation effort
Build our endowment and prepare for a healthy future
  • Support staff leadership growth
  • Provide staff training to expand internal expertise in specific program areas
CEO/Executive Director Statement

I founded the Coastal Conservation League in 1989 because many people (including me) were afraid that population growth along the coast would endanger the beauty, wildlife and culture that makes this place so wonderful. Today the pressures are more intense than ever before.

The Coastal Conservation League is an advocacy organization and is the only nonprofit in the state that intensively works at the state and local level on environmental issues affecting the coastal region. We are frequently involved in issues with complicated laws, rules, procedures and policies regarding land use, water quality and wildlife protection. Oftentimes we are involved in issues before the public even hears about them. Because our influence and history of success is so strong, our professionals are often asked to provide advice and assistance to those who are considering land development opportunities, or to officials who are planning policy changes. We work in front and behind the scenes to protect this natural landscape that so many of us cherish.

For a quarter century, we’ve protected important natural and farm lands and rivers and estuaries, and promoted smart growth patterns in our cities and towns. We have focused on protecting a greenbelt of land around our coastal cities, worked with business and government to promote smart land use policies that protect wildlife while allowing healthy growth to continue. These policies help ensure that homes and businesses are located in places where transportation infrastructure and services are available so that traffic gridlock is minimized. We’ve stopped coal-fired power plant construction and were instrumental in the development of the state’s first solar energy laws.

With offices in Charleston, Beaufort, Columbia and Georgetown, we work with communities on the issues that are important to them. Few who live here want this coast to become like the coast of Florida where natural areas have been replaced with strip malls and housing developments. We also don’t want our coastal cities to become like Charlotte or Atlanta, where sprawling cities and gridlock make daily travel difficult.

Our history of success justifies our optimism about the future, even in the fact of dynamic challenges.

Board Chair Statement

I’ve served on the board of the Coastal Conservation League since 2009 and as chair since 2014. I got involved because I saw tremendous development growth and the resulting alarming threats to the South Carolina coast, especially in the Charleston area. The Coastal Conservation League is the only organization that works in Columbia, in our counties and cities, and with residents to protect the land, water, air and historic communities that make this a wonderful place to live, do business and raise a family. The Coastal Conservation League helps protect important landscapes, promote wise growth patterns in our cities, and protect the wildlife that is so essential to our environment. The quality of life along the South Carolina coast is one of the reasons people are moving here at unprecedented rates, building businesses and growing the economy. The Coastal Conservation League helps protect the natural resources and landscapes that keep this place special.

I support the Coastal Conservation League with my time and money for a number of reasons. I want my young boys to be able to fish in clean water, play on pristine sandy beaches, and grow to love this land as I have. I grew up in a coastal community in Connecticut. Little by little, the farms were replaced with commercial development. The town lost its soul. I don’t identify with the town that place has become. As a result, I have seen what can happen when growth is left un-checked. My desire is for the coast of South Carolina to grow in a more thoughtful way that balances growth with conservation. The Coastal Conservation League work every day to advocate for these balanced solutions.

I have served on a number of boards during the past fifteen years. The Conservation League is the most professional and effective group with which I have had the pleasure to work. The staff is unparalleled in its ability to prioritize and achieve results. Additionally, the board is diverse, committed and passionate. I am proud to serve on the Conservation League board. Not only for the reasons I have indicated but because it is one of the most well regarded conservation organizations in the country.

Areas of Service
Area
Beaufort County
Colleton County
Hampton County
Jasper County
Our work covers the entire South Carolina coastal plain. The South Coast region includes Colleton, Beaufort, Jasper, and Hampton Counties. The North Coast region includes Georgetown and Horry Counties on the coast and all the way inland to the rural Pee Dee counties. We have worked on environmental legislation at the state level since our founding in 1989. Our legislative office is located in downtown Columbia. Charleston serves as our headquarters.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mrs. Andrea Cooper
Company Affiliation Ziff Properties, Inc.
Term Nov 2014 to Dec 2015
Email acooper@zpi.net
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Mr. Johnston C. Adams Board Member
Mr. Joel Andy Berly Board Member
Mr. William Cogswell Board Member
Ms. Ceara Donnelley Board Member
Mr. Berryman W. Edwards Board Member
Mrs. Katharine Hastie Board Member
Ms. Deborah Kennedy Kennard Board Member
Mr. Jeffrey Leath Board Member
Mr. Pierre Manigault Board Member
Mr. James R. McNab Jr.Board Member
Mr. Roy Richards Jr.Board Vice Chair
Mrs. Margot T. Rose Board Member
Mr. Richard Schmaltz Board Member
Mr. Jeffrey Schutz Board Member
Mr. Charles Tarver Board Member
Mr. John Thompson Board Member
Mr. David Westerlund Board Member
Mr. Stephen Zoukis Board Member
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 18
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 14
Female 5
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 95%
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Other Boards
The tables below contain information about other groups that advise this nonprofit on operations and projects.
Executive Director
Executive Director/CEO Mr. Edward Dana Beach
Experience Since founding the Coastal Conservation League in 1989, Dana has received awards from many institutions, including the United States Environmental Protection Agency, the South Carolina General Assembly, and the American Institute of Architects. In 1998, Dana was named one of ten Heroes for the Planet by Time Magazine's, Time for Kids. In March of 2000, he received the Order of the Palmetto, South Carolina's highest honor, awarded by the Office of the Governor for outstanding contributions to the state. He is the author of the Pew Oceans Commission's publication, Coastal Sprawl: The Impacts of Development on Aquatic Ecosystems. He graduated magna cum laude from Davidson College and received his MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
Staff
Full Time Staff 30
Part Time Staff 2
Volunteers 19
Contractors 2
Plans
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Diversity Policy
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Programs
Description

Land and Community – Balancing unbridled growth is central to the Conservation League’s mission. We help to influence the way developers, citizens, and public officials view and value their communities and landscapes – promoting thoughtful, balanced development and land conservation in the right areas at the right scale. From restructuring zoning codes to redesigning highways, we provide technical and professional assistance to residents of the region to preserve the South Carolina coast.

Budget $646,074
Short Term Success

In some cases, like Captain Sams Spit, success means preventing development. In others, success means smart, sustainable development in the right place and at the right scale, like East Edisto and Cainhoy Plantation. Maintaining and increasing funding for conservation through the Conservation Bank, the Beaufort Rural and Critical Lands Program, and mitigation banking helps protect valuable lands throughout South Carolina. Successful advocacy means inhibiting the elimination of protections afforded to wetlands in Dorchester County by the Coastal Management Program and preventing an unwise precedent for other counties. Successful advocacy also means extending the life of the Conservation Bank into perpetuity and eliminating the clause that zeroes out agency funding in tough budget years.

Long Term Success

Our vision is a future in which we strive for common ground and the balance of nature and community. This future includes smart, sustainable, economic growth that maximizes the potential of our community, ensures the availability of natural resources and opportunity for our children to enjoy those resources, and has good policies and protection in place so we do more than fight an endless series of battles against an endless series of threats. We evaluate our each projects based on this vision.

Strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored BY Evaluation and success vary by project. We evaluate our each projects based on the advancement of our long-term vision.
Description

Air and Water Quality – Clean air and water are essential to our health and quality of life in South Carolina. We work to educate the public, media, industry, and local and state policy makers on the science and economics of clean air and water policies. Our advocacy brings attention to the latest scientific and medical research on air and water pollution and public health issues. In addition to promoting policies to protect clean air and water, we ensure such policies are enforced by monitoring all air and water quality permits along the coast and appealing permits that would harm the environment or public health.

Budget $420,746
Short Term Success Short-term success in this program area will result in comprehensive mitigations of cruise ship impacts including caps of the number and size of ships, enforceable discharge limits, shoreside power, and offsite parking; inhibiting the elmination of protections to wetlands through the Coastal Management Program; blocking Oakridge Landfills permit to expand into 14 acres of wetlands in the Francis Beidler Forest; ensuring the evaluation of environmental impacts and regulations for the proposed Cannonball Jellyfish processing operation so wastewater discharge does not degrade the waterways of St. Helena Sound; and upholding the Captain Sams Spit baseline established under the South Carolina Beachfront Management Act of 1988. 
Long Term Success

Our vision is a future in which we strive for common ground and the balance of nature and community. This future includes smart, sustainable, economic growth that maximizes the potential of our community, ensures the availability of natural resources and opportunity for our children to enjoy those resources, and has good policies and protection in place so we do more than fight an endless series of battles against an endless series of threats. 

Strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored BY Evaluation and success vary by project. We evaluate our each projects based on the advancement of our long-term vision.
Description

Food and Agriculture – Local farms and farmers are critical components of a vibrant community. Supporting sustainable agriculture benefits individuals, communities, the environment, and the economy. We work with farmers, government agencies and officials, businesses, nonprofit organizations, and communities to support the local food system through state policy, local planning, infrastructure, technical assistance, and outreach and communications. In 2011, the Conservation League launched GrowFood Carolina, South Carolina's first and only local food hub. GrowFood Carolina's mission isto help the local food market reach its full potential by providing meaningful opportunites to rural farmers that will strengthen and secure the future of a regional food supply and ensure that rural lands remain in agricultural use.

Budget $286,498
Short Term Success Short-term success in this program area will result in strengthening the Surface Water Withdrawal Act of 2010 by developing and implementing a water management program that will protect river flows, watersheds, and riparian rights; passing an ordinance creating Voluntary Agricultural Districts in Charleston County that can serve as a model for statewide replication; preserving the unique fishing culture and promoting sustainable fishing along Shem Creek; and surpassing $1M in gross annual sales in 2016 and $1.5M in gross annual sales in 2017 at GrowFood Carolina, 
Long Term Success

Our vision is a future in which we strive for common ground and the balance of nature and community. This future includes smart, sustainable, economic growth that maximizes the potential of our community, ensures the availability of natural resources and opportunity for our children to enjoy those resources, and has good policies and protection in place so we do more than fight an endless series of battles against an endless series of threats. 

Strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored BY Evaluation and success vary by project. We evaluate our each projects based on the advancement of our long-term vision.
Description

Energy and Climate – Electricity is a necessary fixture in our daily lives, and its production and distribution have vast environmental footprints. New technologies, fuel sources, and strategies for meeting energy demand hold great promise for minimizing our impacts. We promote the implementation of progressive local, state, and federal energy policies related to renewable energy, energy efficiency, and climate change.

Budget $434,165
Short Term Success

The Conservation League anticipates significant quantitative changes in the amount of clean energy resources utilized within South Carolina, as well as qualitative changes for consumers who will enjoy a higher quality of life as a consequence of the cleaner air and water, electricity savings, and economic development opportunities that come with increased use of local, clean energy resources.

Long Term Success

Our vision is a future in which we strive for common ground and the balance of nature and community. This future includes smart, sustainable, economic growth that maximizes the potential of our community, ensures the availability of natural resources and opportunity for our children to enjoy those resources, and has good policies and protection in place so we do more than fight an endless series of battles against an endless series of threats. 

Strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored BY Evaluation and success vary by project. We evaluate our each projects based on the advancement of our long-term vision.
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year 2015
Projected Revenue $2,810,200.00
Projected Expenses $2,763,300.00
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$2,098,339$1,793,470$1,889,328
Administration Expense$386,782$438,409$316,856
Fundraising Expense$552,666$522,114$447,513
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.350.900.87
Program Expense/Total Expenses69%65%71%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue18%26%23%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$11,007,841$9,726,606$9,439,583
Current Assets$1,836,840$1,723,679$1,913,654
Long-Term Liabilities$300,000$303,410$303,250
Current Liabilities$273,920$188,902$154,563
Total Net Assets$10,433,921$9,234,294$8,981,770
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities6.719.1212.38
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets3%3%3%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose Our $20 "Growing Together" campaign will: -Expand our programs to protect the quality of life along the coast, including significant investment in our local food hub, GrowFood Carolina -Increase our support base by engaging a new legion of conservationists -Build our endowment and internal infrastructure to help implement our mission long into the future
Goal $20,000,000
Dates May 2015 to Dec 2019
Amount Raised To Date 3752146 as of July 2015
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
Registration Yes May 0
Nonprofit South Carolina Coastal Conservation League, Inc.
Address P.O. Box 1765
Charleston, SC 29402
Primary Phone (843) 7238035
Contact Email action@scccl.org
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Edward Dana Beach
Board Chair Mrs. Andrea Cooper
Board Chair Company Affiliation Ziff Properties, Inc.
Year of Incorporation 1989