Neighborhood Outreach Connection
PO BOX 23558
Hilton Head Island SC 29925-3558
Contact Information
Organization DBA (Doing Business As)
Organization DBA
Neighborhood Outreach Connection (NOC)
Address PO BOX 23558
Hilton Head Island, SC 299253558
Telephone (843) 681-4100
Fax (843) 681-4100
E-mail admin@noc-sc.org
Projected Annual Revenue $483,000.00 (2016)
Mission Statement The mission of Neighborhood Outreach Connection (NOC) is to fight poverty by helping all individuals in the community achieve the "American Dream" -- economic independence, progress, and personal fulfillment. NOC's focus is on empowering the individual, families, and communities through its core programs: education, health care, and workforce development. NOC maintains an active presence in under served neighborhoods by establishing program centers in these neighborhoods. We teach people "how to fish" by creating opportunities, so that they will be independent, self-reliant, and have dignity.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Narendra P. Sharma, Volunteer
Board Chair Dr. Narendra P. Sharma, Volunteer
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retiree
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 2007
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expenses Bar Graph - All Years
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
Revenue vs Expenses Area Graph - All Years

Comparing revenue to expenses shows how the organizations finances fluctuate over time.

Source: IRS Form 990

 Breakdown
Net Gain/Loss:    in 
Note: When component data are not available, the graph displays the total Revenue and/or Expense values.
Additional Documents
Other Documents 3
Budget2016View
NOC Model2015View
Statements
Mission The mission of Neighborhood Outreach Connection (NOC) is to fight poverty by helping all individuals in the community achieve the "American Dream" -- economic independence, progress, and personal fulfillment. NOC's focus is on empowering the individual, families, and communities through its core programs: education, health care, and workforce development. NOC maintains an active presence in under served neighborhoods by establishing program centers in these neighborhoods. We teach people "how to fish" by creating opportunities, so that they will be independent, self-reliant, and have dignity.
Background Neighborhood Outreach Connection (NOC) was founded in 2008 by Dr. Narendra Sharma, 32-year World Bank veter­an, 2013 Purpose Prize fellow, recipient of a 2015 Daily Point of Light Award. NOC’s purpose is to alleviate poverty by helping all individuals in the community achieve economic and social progress.With an over-arching goal of community development, NOC, a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization, harnesses the energy and potential of families, communities, schools, libraries, health providers, businesses, and other non-profits to break the cycle of generational poverty in underserved neighborhoods – one neighborhood at a time. NOC focuses on empowerment of people through its core programs: education (mainly preschool, elementary, middle school), health care, and workforce development, all built on  a strong presence in the neighborhood. NOC staff and volunteers work in target communities, con­necting, listening, and involving residents in programs and services. NOC's bottom-up approach focuses on development of the individual, the family, and the community through small, low-cost neighborhood projects that are sustainable and that can be replicated.NOC’s unique model (below) is innovative, results-oriented, and cost effective.

NOC brings learning programs, technology, health screenings, and social entrepreneurship to people in underserved neighborhoods with limited pathways to academic and economic success. NOC Program Centers, located in low-income neighborhoods in Beaufort County, South Carolina, are within walking distance of children’s homes. The Centers have been renovated by local residents to accommodate classrooms and virtual learning labs equipped with computers and internet access. The Centers are managed by trained Program Managers with support from a Neighborhood Liaison, and NOC’s field staff of part-time teachers and volunteers. NOC also plays an important role as a "connector" by bringing human service providers into low-income neighborhoods to deliver assistance more directly and effectively.
Impact NOC accomplished the following:
(a) In 2015 NOC’s after school program helped more than 450 minority students (K through Grade 8) improve academic performance in math, reading, and language arts; more than 95% of these students showed academic growth based on schools’ standardized tests.
(b) NOC expanded its pilot pre-school program in four program centers in HHI and Bluffton with more than 50 children participating to help these children acquire the right learning skills to enter kindergarten.
(c) More than 300 people benefitted from NOC’s health screenings in HHI and Bluffton for hypertension, diabetes, breast and prostate cancer, HIVAIDS, hearing, vision, dental hygiene, and nutrition.
(d) NOC expanded its services in Hilton Head Island and began providing an after-school program and the virtual summer learning program in the south-end of the Island, covering 3 neighborhoods (Cordillo, Hedges, and Woodhaven Apartments).
(e) More recently, NOC opened 2 new centers in downtown Beaufort, targeting 100 African American children in Parkview and Marshe Pointe Apartments with a grant of $163,000 from the State of South Carolina.
NOC’s goals for the next 3 years:
(a) Increase NOC Program Centers from 6 to 8 to include additional neighborhoods in Beaufort and Jasper counties. (Add another 300 students and 100 hours of learning time)
(b) Raise pre-school (< 5 years) children's readiness to enter pre-K, improve academic performance outcomes of children in K through Grade 8, and empower non-English speaking individuals in low-in­come neighborhoods to achieve functional English. (Supporting outcome goals set by BCSD and United Way.)
(c) Improve health of people living in low-income neighborhoods through outreach, health screenings, referrals, education, and case management. (Target 300 persons annually.)
(d) Increase donations from private contributors by $1,000,000, over a three year period (2015-2017) to hire an Executive Director, a Field Director and setting a Learning Center is Jasper County.
(e) Promote NOC's brand, business model, and results through aggres­sive marketing, especially in support of fund raising.
Needs NOC’s current priority needs:
(a) NOC needs to raise $1,000,000 during 2016-2017 to sustain and expand its outreach programs in Beaufort and Jasper Counties.
(b) Hire an experienced Executive Director to advance NOC’s mission, raise capital by broadening the organization’s funding base, build and maintain relationships with other pertinent agencies, and manage day to day operations, as well as a Field Director to oversee the six Learning Centers in Beaufort County.
(c) Development of NOC documentation (legal, organizational, and finacial) to allow replication of NOC model in other locations throughout the country.
(d) Develop a stronger volunteer pool for office work and field operations.
(e) Market NOC model effectively using best practices and innovative tools.
CEO/Executive Director Statement NOC’s unique model is innovative, people focused, results oriented, and cost effective. It strong presence in underserved neighborhoods, allows NOC to work closely with parents and families in these neighborhoods. NOC brings learning programs, technology, health screenings, and social entrepreneurship to people with limited pathways to academic and economic success. NOC Program Centers, located in low-income neighborhoods in Beaufort County, are within walking distance of children’s homes. The Centers have been renovated by local residents to accommodate classrooms and virtual learning labs equipped with computers and internet access. The Centers are managed by trained Program Managers with support from a Neighborhood Liaison, and NOC’s field staff of part-time teachers and volunteers. Technology has become an important dimension of NOC education program. NOC’s children are showing growth and progress in standardized test scores administered by the local schools. Furthermore, NOC’s delivery cost is significantly less than $1,200 per year per child participating in its education program.
Board Chair Statement As the founder of the organization, NOC is a reflection of my vision, beliefs, and core values. After more than three decades at the World Bank, I retired and moved to HHI. I soon recognized that I still had something to offer in helping the poor. I visited one of the low-income neighborhoods, the Oaks Apartments ( 115 units, more than 750 people), in HHI , and came to the realization that I did not have to go overseas to fight poverty. Poverty was right here in my own backyard. This experience was a game changer in my life.
People – mostly Hispanics and African Americans – were living in this crime-ridden neighborhood with no sense of community or connectedness with the rest of Hilton Head. Unemployment was high; families struggled to survive on incomes below the poverty threshold; children were not meeting school standards in math and language arts, many were not staying in school, or graduating on time. I found that families had no health insurance or health care; obesity and poor nutrition were rampant. My experience in the Oaks neighborhood ignited my passion to help these people. My mantra became “teach them how and where to fish.”
My career at the World Bank was educational. I saw the impact of development; I saw affluence as well as poverty and suffering; and I saw the difference that education was making in people’s lives. I met many interesting individuals, including Mother Theresa. She made an indelible impression on me and her focus on love, compassion, and caring for others continues to have an impact on me. I met others too who were doing outstanding work in their quiet and humble way without any publicity. From all of these people I learned that one must have clear vision, a sense of mission, and core values. More importantly, one cannot lose sight of the end game, i.e., making a difference in the lives of the people you serve.
NOC, created in 2008, incorporates the lessons that I have learned about good practices (connecting and building relationships, listening to people, and involving people in developing solution) over more than three decades of development experience worldwide. NOC helps the poor through its core programs including education (preschool, after school, and adult education), health services, and workforce development by bringing valuable services, resources, and technology to people within these neighborhoods.
NOC started with just five children using borrowed space in the apartment of a neighborhood family. After eight years of operation, we have grown to more than 450 children. More than 1500 individuals benefit from our periodic health screenings, and more than 350 adults have benefited from our adult education. NOC has a strong presence in the neighborhoods that we serve, a proven development approach, and a business model that collectively are making a difference in the lives many people, especially the children, living in low-income neighborhoods. We connect, listen, and involve people from these neighborhoods to develop solutions. Our work is drawing attention from people in other areas.
NOC is now ready to replicate its model beyond Beaufort County. My vision is to create an even playing field in low income neighborhoods throughout the country so people can achieve the “American Dream”.
CEO/Executive Director/Board Comments Education will continue to be NOC’s priority. The program will continue to serve underserved neighborhoods in Beaufort County where poverty is significant and opportunities are limited. NOC will target pre-school children who are not in school now and children who are in school, from pre-K through Grade 8. (Oaks Apartments, Hilton Head Garden Apartments, Sandalwood Apartments, Wood Lake Apartments, Tabby Walk Apartments, and households from Mathews Drive, Gum Tree Road, Squire Pope Road, Wild Horse Road, and Spanish Wells, Cordillo Courts, The Hedges, and Woodhaven on Hilton Head Island; in Bluffton, Bluffton House Apartments and Simmons Cay Apartments; and in Beaufort, Parkview Apartments and Marsh Pointe Apartments). Together these neighborhoods account for more than 12,000 people. The children served will be mainly African Americans and Hispanics, many of whom come from single-parent households. Many families in these neighborhoods are unemployed or underemployed and are economically insecure with limited opportunities. In many households where NOC is present, Hispanic parents are illiterate in English, and some are even illiterate in their own language. While many parents and guardians want their children to excel in school, they are ill equipped educationally to help their children academically on a regular basis. Many children in these neighborhoods lack access to computers and internet connections which only serves to further hamper their participation in school learning programs that use Internet-based learning platforms. Finally, many households in these low-income neighborhoods are transient, with families moving out when better job opportunities become available elsewhere and then returning back to their old neighborhood when the local economy improves.
Areas of Service
Area
Beaufort County
Beaufort County: Hilton Head Island, Bluffton, and Town of Beaufort
Board Chair
Board Chair Dr. Narendra P. Sharma, Volunteer
Company Affiliation Retiree
Term July 2008 to July 2018
Email fijisharma@yahoo.com
Board of Directors
NameAffiliation
Will Achurch Wells Fargo
Vickie Baumann Community Volunteer
Bill Evans Community Volunteer
Ally McNair, Vice Chairperson Community Volunteer
Carl Miller Community Volunteer
George Paletta Community Volunteer
Narendra P. Sharma PhD, ChairpersonCommunity Volunteer
Gary Tauscher Community Volunteer
Sue Todd, Secretary Community Volunteer
Henry West Community Volunteer
John Weymouth Community Volunteer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 3
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 6
Board Meeting Attendance % 95%
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 80%
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Standing Committees
Board Development / Board Orientation
Capital Campaign
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Education
Nominating
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Other Boards
The tables below contain information about other groups that advise this nonprofit on operations and projects.
Comments
NOC continues to rely on a working Board and Executive Committee that is involved in a broad spectrum of governance, management, and operations. This arrangement is in keeping with its resources and capacity, the environment in which it operates, and its fiduciary responsibilities. NOC relies on its Executive Committee (headed by the Chairman of the Board of Directors), as approved by its Board of Directors, for the development and delivery of its products, results on the ground, and resource mobilization. The Executive Committee is actively involved in NOC’s governance, management, and operations. For implementation, NOC relies on its field team of program managers, coordinators, teachers, high school student tutors, part-time workers, volunteers, and neighborhood leaders. The latter have become an effective way to empower neighborhood residents and to get them involved more directly in various outreach programs. NOC has also established neighborhood connections with residents and parents to promote ownership of programs and to get people involved in determining needs and priorities.
NOC relies on a small cadre of part-time employees and volunteers to keep its central administrative costs low, channeling a high proportion of its resources to the frontline to benefit the poor and those in need. For its frontline work, NOC relies heavily on its Director of Field Operations, Program Managers, Neighborhood Liaisons, teachers, and volunteers (more than 100 individuals). NOC places more emphasis on field operations so that the bulk of its resources and capacity are directed to help the people who are in need. As a result, NOC’s model has lower overhead costs. As NOC is now in its second five-year phase, NOC’s priority is to hire an experienced Executive Director to run the organization and a Field Director to manage its operations in the field.
Executive Director
Executive Director/CEO Dr. Narendra P. Sharma, Volunteer
Experience Dr. Sharma has more than 40 years of experience in applied development work worldwide. He worked for more than 32 years at the World Bank in Washington, DC, where he was involved in finance and economic development in more than 50 developing countries in Asia and the Pacific, South America, Central America and the Caribbean, and Africa. He has traveled widely throughout the world and has a broad international perspective on and understanding of social, economic development, and environmental issues at the global, regional, national, and local level. He has over 30 years of experience in management, and in dealing with high ranking government civil servants, international and regional policy forums, multi- and bilateral development agencies, non-governmental organizations, and businesses. He has a PhD in economic development from Virginia Tech University, as well as an MS from Rutgers, an MEM from Duke University, and a BS from the University of Hawaii. Dr. Sharma specializes in applied economic development and finance, public policy and project analysis, and organizational effectiveness. Dr. Sharma has also been involved in teaching and research. He was Adjunct Professor at Duke University, School of the Environment (1991-2005) and has more than 30 years of experience in training and mentoring of people. As the founder of this organization, Dr. Sharma plans to devote ten years to building and establishing NOC as a relevant organization that has impact and serves its clients with integrity, compassion, and commitment. NOC is beginning to implement a succession plan. It is building a Board that will take the organization to the next level of development and expansion. NOC has a Vice Chair who is being groomed to take over the organization by July 2018. We are now seeking an experienced CEO/Executive Director to run the organization and a Field Director to manage operations in the field. In addition, NOC is working to develop a blueprint document for replication on the NOC model throughout the state and country.
Staff
Full Time Staff 0
Part Time Staff 6
Volunteers 50
Contractors 35
Plans
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Mar 2014
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Management Succession Plan? Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Diversity Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Collaborations
In education sector, NOC collaborates with BCSD and local schools, The Sandbox Museum, The Literacy Center, and the Beaufort County Library. NOC has a substantive partnership with BCSD through a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to improve academic performance of minority children living in low-income neighborhoods. This partnership allows for: (a) Sharing of information and data that relate to performance and needs; (b) Identification of students who need tutoring and their specific academic needs; (c) Implementation of learning programs at NOC’s Program Centers; (d) Establishment of effective communication among parents, teachers, and NOC field staff; (e) Acquiring tutors from schools who will work with students; and (f) Measurement of outcomes by agreeing on a common set of performance indicators. In addition, NOC has a working partnership with the Sandbox Museum and the Beaufort County Library focusing on early childhood education. NOC has also developed partnership with the Beaufort County’s Alliance for Human Services in programs relating to pre-natal health care, and workforce development. NOC is also collaborating with several faith-based organizations locally. In the health sector, NOC is partnering with the Beaufort Memorial Hospital, VIM, DEHEC, and Ronald McDonald.
Programs
Description

After school and summer program: NOC's flagship educational program (which serves over 450 students in Beaufort County) includes one-on-one afterschool tu­toring and a summer program for students K through 8th grade. Each Center located in a low income neighborhood is outfitted with computers and individualized curricula. Students in the after school program attend 4 days per week, 1½ hours a day focused on homework and tutoring under the guidance of teachers from local schools and volunteers. In the summer program, children spend 4 days per week, 2 hours a day reinforcing math and language arts skills, minimizing loss of proficiency over the summer.  Teachers and technology are important components of NOC's model.

Budget 60% of budget
Short Term Success Performance:

· 90% of students will show progress in math and 75% in reading, based on MAP, Measures of Academic Progress, the state standardized test.

· 75% of students will meet state standards set for reading and math, respectively, based on ACT ASpire of BCSD.

Attendance:

· Attendance will be at least 80% each day to ensure learning and retention of educational skills.

Personal Responsibility:

· Students will gain a sense of ownership over their actions and practice the skills of a good neighbor towards themselves, their peers, their teachers, and their environment (Measured by number of disciplinary actions).

Parent Responsibility:

· 80% of parents will be actively involved in children’s learning through NOC’s after-school program.

Long Term Success In the long run, over 90% of the students will graduate on time from high school.
Strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored BY

NOC has already established a good monitoring and evaluation framework to assess results in partnership with the BCSD. NOC will continue to work with the BCSD and local schools to monitor results continuously, focusing on project inputs, outputs, and impact to ensure that project components are being implemented as planned and according to the implementation schedule, as well as to improve decisions relating to project activities and scope. Program outcomes will be measured in terms of academic achievements, For children who are already in school, outcomes will include an increased number of students passing standardized BCSD tests (Measures of Academic Progress, MAP, and the ACT Aspire state standardized test).

Description

The Pre-school program includes classes once or twice a week for 50 children under 5 years old for school readiness. Each child is accompanied by his or her mother or guardian for a one-hour class that will be held at NOC’s Program Centers within the neighborhood. This program is carried out by NOC in partnership with the BCSD’s Readiness Department.  In the past, NOC has collaborated with The Sandbox Museum, and the Beaufort County Library. The Pre-school Program focuses on cognitive skills, language, motor skills , numbers, and recognition of colors. Adults will be taught about skills and provided with activities that can be carried out in the home environment.

Budget 10% of budget
Short Term Success Over 80% of pre-school children will show progress in acquiring  learning skills.
Long Term Success Over 80% of the pre-school children will be ready to enter kindergarten.
Strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored BY The testing at the entry point (Kindergarten) by the BCSD and Early Childhood Center of BCSD.
Description

NOC provides health screenings to local residents in local income neighborhoods through periodic visits by Beaufort Memorial Hospital's Mobile Unit, Volunteers in Medicine (HHI's Free Clinic & flagship model for 92 clinics nationwide), Ronal McDonald, and the Lions Club. Health screenings focus on identifying such health conditions as hyper­tension, diabetes, HIVAIDS, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and dental and vision needs. Residents are referred for needed services. In 2014, more than 300 people were screened through NOC health programs. Together with its partners, NOC plans to screen about 300 people in 2015.

Budget 3% of budget
Short Term Success 200 people will be screened for various diseases.
Long Term Success Over 70% of the people will enjoy healthy life style.
Strategy Yes
Program Success Monitored BY More work is needed to monitor impact.
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year 2016
Projected Revenue $483,000.00
Projected Expenses $332,000.00
Endowment Value $5,000.00
Spending Policy N/A
Audit Documents
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$253,697$181,388$91,113
Administration Expense$23,827$35,993$35,428
Fundraising Expense$5,985$21,153$2,915
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.371.282.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses89%76%70%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%7%1%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$388,479$280,322$213,760
Current Assets$247,763$129,389$145,113
Long-Term Liabilities$3,371$0$0
Current Liabilities$0$734$136
Total Net Assets$385,108$279,588$213,624
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities--176.281067.01
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets1%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201520142013
Top Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar Amount -- -- --
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
Registration Yes Dec 2016
Comments
Organization Comments NOC's goal is to raise $1 million over a three-year period (2015-2017) to sustain and expand its outreach program.  More importantly, this funding will allow NOC to hire an experienced Executive Director to run the organization and Field Director to manage the field operations.  This is an important component of NOC's succession plan.
Nonprofit Neighborhood Outreach Connection
Address PO BOX 23558
Hilton Head Island, SC 299253558
Primary Phone (843) 681-4100
Contact Email admin@noc-sc.org
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Narendra P. Sharma, Volunteer
Board Chair Dr. Narendra P. Sharma, Volunteer
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retiree
Year of Incorporation 2007